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Road to the Sea

Description In this poignant story of new found love and love discarded, reminiscent of some of Graham Greene’s novels, Tim Schell takes us to Central Africa where a young American, an African prostitute and the seventeen-year-old daughter of American Baptist missionaries are on the run from the police and other threats. The American, Jack Burke, has stabbed to death a Frenchman in the act of raping Mari, the prostitute and Jack’s former lover. She is the one arrested, but Jack confesses, then flees because of extreme fear of confinement, the result of childhood trauma. The daughter, Faith, joins their flight in her love for Jack. While the novel dramatizes a suspenseful adventure of danger, escape and death, the intense action engages questions of love, loyalty and belief. About the Author Tim Schell is the winner of the 2004 Mammoth Book Award for Prose for his novel The Drums of Africa which was published in the fall of 2007. In 2010, Tim’s novel The Memoir of Jake Weedsong was The Finalist in the AWP novel competition, and in 2011 it was published by Serving House Books. Tim is the co-author of Mooring Against the Tide: Writing Fiction and Poetry (Prentice Hall, 2nd edition, 2006) and the co-editor of the anthology A Writer’s Country (Prentice Hall, 2001). Currently, he is the Chair of the Writing, Literature and Foreign Language Department at Columbia Gorge Community College in Hood River, Oregon. Praise Sometimes a book just comes along and knocks down the door and grabs your sleeve with its big story and you read breathlessly for a couple of days, miss work, hide your phone, honest to god, to find out what happened.  Road to the Sea is one of those books; I am thrilled at its appearance.  Seriously: thrilled.  Tim Schell is a sure-footed, fine writer, and this is his best. Just a warning to my friends: a book is coming to your house. —R Ron Carlson, author of Five Skies Road to the Sea, Tim Schell’s latest novel, though set in the Dark Continent, is not a journey into the heart of darkness but into the human spirit to endure and rise. Read more…

The Silver Baron’s Wife

Description The Silver Baron’s Wife traces the rags-to-riches-to-rags life of Colorado’s Baby Doe Tabor (Lizzie). This fascinating heroine worked in the silver mines and had two scandalous marriages, one to a philandering opium addict and one to a Senator and silver baron worth $24 million in the late 19th century.   A divorcée shunned by Denver society, Lizzie raised two daughters in a villa where 100 peacocks roamed the lawns, entertained Sarah Bernhardt when the actress performed at Tabor’s Opera House, and after her second husband’s death, moved to a one-room shack at the Matchless Mine in Leadville. She lived the last 35 years of her life there, writing down thousands of her dreams and noting visitations of spirits on her calendar.   Hers is the tale of a fiercely independent woman who bucked all social expectations by working where 19thcentury women didn’t work, becoming the key figure in one of the West’s most scandalous love triangles, and, after a devastating stock market crash destroyed Tabor’s vast fortune, living in eccentric isolation at the Matchless Mine. An earlier version of this novel won the PEN/New England Discovery Award in Fiction. Author Information DONNA BAIER STEIN is the author of Sympathetic People (Iowa Fiction Award Finalist and 2015 IndieBook Awards Finalist) and Sometimes You Sense the Difference (Finishing Line Press Poetry Chapbook). Her work has appeared in Virginia Quarterly Review, Prairie Schooner, Puerto del Sol, New York Quarterly, Writer’s Digest, and elsewhere. She was a founding Poetry Editor at Bellevue Literary Review and now publishes Tiferet Journal. She has received prizes from the Allen Ginsberg Awards, a Bread Loaf Scholarship, a PEN/New England Discovery Award, a Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars Fellowship, a grant from the New Jersey Council for the Arts, three Pushcart nominations and more. www.donnabaierstein.com. Praise At long last we get to hear Baby Doe’s compelling side of the hurtful tale that made her the most hated woman in the West. Donna Baier Stein has captured young Lizzie’s Doe’s agency in her first marriage, as well as older Lizzie’s Tabor’s deep spiritual resilience during her decades of isolation. Through Stein’s artistry, Baby Doe’s story makes the heart ache. Read more…

All the Dark We Will Not See

Description The place is Washington, D.C., and the year,1984. The ruthless dictatorship envisioned by George Orwell has not come to pass. Or has it? Under the presidency of a former Hollywood actor, the struggle for America’s soul has begun-a trial of conscience and idealism versus idolatry and political dictatorship. The White House and its minions intend to shield the government from real public scrutiny, and with hundreds of billions at stake, any means necessary will be used to protect the corporate mobsters who now pull strings and triggers in every agency from the “Star Wars” Pentagon down to the to the trash collecting GSA. But it won’t be easy. A resistance movement composed of rebellious government workers has formed, and they call themselves, The American Watch. Their leader, Laney Dracos, is a powerful government insider with strong ties to Capitol Hill. Like her partisan companions in the Watch, she rejects cooperation with the regime and plans for Its demise with the help of the fourth estate. However, when a naive new co-worker, Edison Eden, becomes an overly enthusiastic sidekick in her war on corporate Washington, she is inevitably forced to choose between her honor or her life. Author Information Michael B. Neff worked in Washington, D.C. during the Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton administrations, leaving shortly after George W. became president. He has lobbied the Senate for greater whistleblower protections and in 2002 joined with the ACLU to successfully defeat Internet censorship laws in Michigan and Arizona. As a government worker, he held jobs in managerial and budget-analyst job series from NASA to GSA. Always an avid writer, his work has appeared in such literary journals as North American Review, Quarterly West, The Literary Review, and Conjunctions. He now directs the Algonkian Conferences, helping new writers get published. Praise All The Dark We Will Not See accurately portrays an important period in American political history wherein the struggle for democracy took a wrong turn … —Thomas Devine, Chief Counsel, Government Accountability Project All The Dark We Will Not See is a compelling, utterly original novel that savagely and hilariously explores what went wrong in this country a couple of decades ago, and that keeps going wrong even now. Neff is a raucous new voice in American literature. Read more…

Nine Facts That Can Change Your Life

Description In this stirring new collection, Ronna Wineberg explores our essential bonds to partners, children, parents, and friends. Intimacy, marriage, parenthood, adultery, divorce, and the legacies left by the past unfold in these beautifully written stories. Men and women search for happiness and love, yet face longing, disappointment, and loss. The characters in Nine Facts That Can Change Your Life struggle with unexpected changes in their own lives but discover the power of kindness, the joy of connection, and the ways in which we can be renewed. Author Information Ronna Wineberg is the author of On Bittersweet Place, her first novel, and a debut collection, Second Language, which won the New Rivers Press Many Voices Project Literary Competition, and was the runner-up for the 2006 Reform Judaism Prize for Jewish Fiction. Her stories have appeared in American Way, Colorado Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, South Dakota Review and elsewhere, and been broadcast on National Public Radio. She is the recipient of a scholarship in fiction to the Bread Loaf Writers Conference and residencies to the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and the Ragdale Foundation. She has been awarded a fellowship in fiction from the New York Foundation for the Arts. She is the founding fiction editor of the Bellevue Literary Review, and lives in New York. www.ronnawineberg.com Praise Nine Facts That Can Change your Life is a richly imagined, deeply felt and unusually fully realized collection. In story after story Ronna Wineberg shows her characters making surprising swerves and connections, reaching from the past into the present. I marvel at how much she can accomplish in a relatively small number of pages, and at how these stories stay with me. Wineberg is a writer of lovely generosity. – Margot Livesey, author of The Flight of Gemma Hardy Ronna Wineberg has written lovely stories, threaded through with the themes of American Jewishness: self hate, self-love, apartness, the urgent need to belong. As well as a wisdom and compassion that come only from deep experience–of writing and of life.” – John Benditt, author of The Boatmaker, winner of the Goldberg Prize, the National Jewish Book Award for debut fiction As Ronna Wineberg notes in Nine Facts That Can Change Your Life, “The human eye is always more than enough.” Her own perceptive eye lands on people in the Midwest, Manhattan, Poland, and German, as they maneuver their way through love and loss. Read more…

Ancestors

Description In Ancestors, Hawkins, a man adrift, finds himself in a Native American homeland called Chaco Canyon, a place of relics haunted by history. He is besieged by voices revealing memories of other lives, including those of his immediate family, truths he had never known: “Like something out of a dream. He could see it, those stone dwellings high on the cliff, speaking of those who had been there who knows when. And who were they? Ancestors, the voice said . . .” Hawkins learns the painful histories of the generations of his origins, who he is, and the quest he must fulfill in spite of the obstacles in his path and temptation to give in and run from the challenges facing him. Ancestors completes Gladys Swan’s Southwestern trilogy, following Ghost Dance and A Dark Gamble, novels also available from Serving House Books. Author Information Gladys Swan has published three novels, Carnival for the Gods, (Vintage Contemporaries Series), Ghost Dance: A Play of Voices, (LSU Press, nominated for the PEN/Faulkner Award), and A Dark Gamble, as well as seven collections of short fiction. Her poetry and essays, and short stories have appeared in many literary magazines and anthologies. Much of her work is set in New Mexico, where she grew up. Though she has spent most of her career as a writer, she has devoted much of her time during the last two decades to painting and exploring the creative process. Read more…

Being

It’s a winter of snow of mythic proportions. Caught in Kierkegaard’s aesthetic stage, Philip Fellows is meanwhile happy to be immured inside with his lover—free to dodge undesirable work—as he seeks continual sensual pleasure. All the while he is being tracked by a mysterious man in black, who eventually informs him he’s in despair. If Philip isn’t ready for Kierkegaard’s second stage, the ethical, he nonetheless becomes captivated by the beauty of a woman who is given to ramping up an ultra-rational, principled approach to the sexual. Read more…

Paris, Etc.

A collection of poems, stories and essays that explore what Paris means to writers who have visited and lived in this fascinating city. These are works that are jubilant, despondent, flippant, stuck, liberated, devastated, bored, solitary, joyous, in love—that explore, in short, a wide rambling space that is not just tragedy or fantasy, but all the life that happens in between. Read more…

No Rule That Isn’t a Dare

I offer up, in summation, writer/director Ron Shelton’s refutation of a younger generation of filmmakers’ blind allegiance to “Show, don’t tell.” “(The) old canard that action defines character is only partly true,” Shelton argued in an interview. “Hamlet wasn’t doing a whole lot when he said, ‘To be or not to be. Read more…

There’s This Place I Know

This book shares an abundance of delightful discoveries. As a viewer-reader, you can’t be sure where the journey will take you next. At one moment you’re intrigued by a green vista that’s next to a close-up of a bird on a patch of parched earth. Turn the page and you’re caught up in the white flow of a waterfall. You never know where you’ll end up as you travel through There’s This Place I Know … It could be in the Swiss Alps or above Parisian rooftops or on the Maine coast or just on a front porch that entices you with a checkered tablecloth. But this book offers much more than photographs. These photos are inseparable from the people who chose them to illustrate spots in the world—their worlds—so vital to their lives. That human connection deepens the significance of the pictures. They invite us into places where the external is the internal and allow us to experience both. Read more…

Chance Encounters of a Literary Kind

Robert Day has invented a new form, the Chance Encounters of a Literary Kind memoirs–brief, whimsical, sometimes touching, reminiscences about his brushes (often friendships) with literary greatness. He treats Shakespeare, William Stafford, Mavis Gallant, John Barth, Ray Carver, Walter Bernstein, and Michael de Montaigne. Some he met and knew in person; others he met in his mind. But the collision is sparkling in its reverent irreverence, airy, gossamer-thin, a playful and informal jeu d’esprit that takes itself not very seriously, yet with flashes of seriousness and wit. Read more…